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OUTCOME 1: CHILDREN HAVE A STRONG SENSE OF IDENTITY

  • Children feel safe, secure, and supported

  • Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

  • Children develop knowledgeable and confident self identities

  • Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect

(Ref: BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia)


Children feel safe, secure, and supported

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • build secure attachments with one and then more familiar educators
  • use effective routines to help make predicted transitions smoothly
  • sense and respond to a feeling of belonging
  • communicate their needs for comfort and assistance
  • establish and maintain respectful, trusting relationships with other children and educators
  • openly express their feelings and ideas in their interactions with others
  • respond to ideas and suggestions from others
  • initiate interactions and conversations with trusted educators
  • confidently explore and engage with social and physical environments through relationships and play
  • initiate and join in play
  •  explore aspects of identity through role play 

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • acknowledge and respond sensitively to children’s cues and signals
  • respond sensitively to children’s attempts to initiate interactions and conversations
  • support children’s secure attachment through consistent and warm nurturing relationships
  • support children in times of change and bridge the gap between the familiar and the unfamiliar
  • build upon culturally valued child rearing practices and approaches to learning
  • are emotionally available and support children’s expression of their thoughts and feelings
  • recognise that feelings of distress, fear or discomfort may take some time to resolve
  • acknowledge each child’s uniqueness in positive ways
  •  spend time interacting and conversing with each child  

 Children develop their emerging autonomy, inter-dependence, resilience and sense of agency

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • demonstrate increasing awareness of the needs and rights of others
  • be open to new challenges and discoveries
  • increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others
  • take considered risk in their decision-making and cope with the unexpected
  • recognise their individual achievements and the achievements of others
  • demonstrate an increasing capacity for self-regulation
  • approach new safe situations with confidence
  • begin to initiate negotiating and sharing behaviours
  • persist when faced with challenges and when first attempts are not successful

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • provide children with strategies to make informed choices about their behaviours
  • promote children’s sense of belonging, connectedness and wellbeing
  • maintain high expectations of each child’s capabilities
  • mediate and assist children to negotiate their rights in relation to the rights of others
  • provide opportunities for children to engage independently with tasks and play
  • display delight, encouragement and enthusiasm for children’s attempts
  • support children’s efforts, assisting and encouraging as appropriate
  • motivate and encourage children to succeed when they are faced with challenges
  • provide time and space for children to engage in both individual and collaborative pursuits
  • build on the culturally valued learning of individual children’s communities
  • encourage children to make choices and decisions

Children develop knowledgeable and confident self identities

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • feel recognised and respected for who they are
  • explore different identities and points of view in dramatic play
  • share aspects of their culture with the other children and educators
  • use their home language to construct meaning
  • develop strong foundations in both the culture and language/s of their family and of the broader community without compromising their cultural identities
  • develop their social and cultural heritage through engagement with Elders and community members
  • reach out and communicate for comfort, assistance and companionship
  • celebrate and share their contributions and achievements with others

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • promote in all children a strong sense of who they are and their connectedness to others – a shared identity as Australians
  • ensure all children experience pride and confidence in their achievements
  • share children’s successes with families
  • show respect for diversity, acknowledging the varying approaches of children, families, communities and cultures
  • acknowledge and understand that children construct meaning in many different ways
  • demonstrate deep understanding of each child, their family and community contexts in planning for children’s learning
  • provide children with examples of the many ways identities and culture are recognised and expressed
  • build upon culturally valued approaches to learning
  • build on the knowledge, languages and understandings that children bring
  • talk with children in respectful ways about similarities and differences in people
  • provide rich and diverse resources that reflect children’s social worlds
  • listen to and learn about children’s understandings of themselves
  • actively support the maintenance of home language and culture
  • develop authentic children’s understanding of themselves

Children learn to interact in relation to others with care, empathy and respect

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • show interest in other children and being part of a group
  • engage in and contribute to shared play experiences
  • express a wide range of emotions, thoughts and views constructively
  • empathise with and express concern for others
  • display awareness of and respect for others perspectives
  • reflect on their actions and consider consequences for others

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • initiate one-to-one interactions with children, particularly babies and toddlers, during daily routines
  • organise learning environments in ways that promote small group interactions and play experiences
  • model care, empathy and respect for children, staff and families
  • model explicit communication strategies to support children to initiate interactions and join in play and social experiences in ways that sustain productive relationships with other children
  • acknowledge children’s complex relationships and sensitively intervene in ways that promote consideration of alternative perspectives and social inclusion 

 

OUTCOME 2: CHILDREN ARE CONNECTED WITH AND CONTRIBUTE TO THEIR WORLD

  • Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

  • Children respond to diversity with respect

  • Children become aware of fairness

  • Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

(Ref:  BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia) 

Children develop a sense of belonging to groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for active community participation

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • begin to recognise that they have a right to belong to many communities
  • cooperate with others and negotiate roles and relationships in play episodes and group experiences
  • take action to assist other children to participate in social groups
  • broaden their understanding of the world in which they live
  • express an opinion in matters that affect them
  • build on their own social experiences to explore other ways of being
  • participate in reciprocal relationships
  • gradually learn to ‘read’ the behaviours of others and respond appropriately
  • understand different ways of contributing through play and projects
  • demonstrate a sense of belonging and comfort in their environments
  • are playful and respond positively to others, reaching out for company and friendship
  • contribute to fair decision-making about matters that affect them

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • promote a sense of community within the early childhood setting
  • build connections between the early childhood setting and the local community
  • provide opportunities for children to investigate ideas, complex concepts and ethical issues that are relevant to their lives and their local communities
  • model language that children can use to express ideas, negotiate roles and collaborate to achieve goals
  • ensure that children have the skills to participate and contribute to group play and projects
  • plan opportunities for children to participate in meaningful ways in group discussions and shared decision-making about rules and expectations

Children respond to diversity with respect

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • begin to show concern for others
  • explore the diversity of culture, heritage, background and tradition and that diversity presents opportunities for choices and new understandings
  • become aware of connections, similarities and differences between people
  • listen to others’ ideas and respect different ways of being and doing
  • practise inclusive ways of achieving coexistence
  • notice and react in positive ways to similarities and differences among people

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • reflect on their own responses to diversity
  • plan experiences and provide resources that broaden children’s perspectives and encourage appreciation of diversity
  • expose children to different languages and dialects and encourage appreciation of linguistic diversity
  • encourage children to listen to others and to respect diverse perspectives
  • demonstrate positive responses to diversity in their own behaviour and in conversations with children
  • engage in interactions with children that promote respect for diversity and value distinctiveness
  • explore the culture, heritage, backgrounds and traditions of each child within the context of their community
  • explore with children their ideas about diversity

Children become aware of fairness

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • discover and explore some connections amongst people
  • become aware of ways in which people are included or excluded from physical and social environments
  • develop the ability to recognise unfairness and bias and the capacity to act with compassion and kindness
  • are empowered to make choices and problem solve to meet their needs in particular contexts
  • begin to think critically about fair and unfair behaviour
  • begin to understand and evaluate ways in which texts construct identities and create stereotypes

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • notice and listen carefully to children’s concerns and discuss diverse perspectives on issues of inclusion and exclusion and fair and unfair behaviour
  • engage children in discussions about respectful and equal relations such as when a child dominates in the use of resources
  • analyse and discuss with children ways in which texts construct a limited range of identities and reinforce stereotypes
  • draw children’s attention to issues of fairness relevant to them in the early childhood setting and community

Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • use play to investigate, project and explore new ideas
  • participate with others to solve problems and contribute to group outcomes
  • demonstrate an increasing knowledge of, and respect for natural and constructed environments
  • explore, infer, predict and hypothesise in order to develop an increased understanding of the interdependence between land, people, plants and animals
  • show growing appreciation and care for natural and constructed environments
  • explore relationships with other living and non-living things and observe, notice and respond to change
  • develop an awareness of the impact of human activity on environments and the interdependence of living things

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • provide children with access to a range of natural materials in their environment
  • model respect, care and appreciation for the natural environment
  • find ways of enabling children to care for and learn from the land
  • consider the nature of children’s connectedness to the land and demonstrate respect for community protocols
  • share information and provide children with access to resources about the environment and the impact of human activities on environments
  • embed sustainability in daily routines and practices
  • look for examples of interdependence in the environment and discuss the ways the life and health of living things are interconnected 

 

OUTCOME 3: CHILDREN HAVE A STRONG SENSE OF WELLBEING

  • Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing

  • Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing

(Ref:  BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia) 

 

Children become strong in their social and emotional wellbeing

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • demonstrate trust and confidence
  • remain accessible to others at times of distress, confusion and frustration
  • share humour, happiness and satisfaction
  • seek out and accept new challenges, make new discoveries, and celebrate their own efforts and achievements and those of others
  • increasingly co-operate and work collaboratively with others
  • enjoy moments of solitude recognise their individual achievement
  • make choices, accept challenges, take considered risks, manage change and cope with frustrations and the unexpected
  • show an increasing capacity to understand, self-regulate and manage their emotions in ways that reflect the feelings and needs of others
  • experience and share personal successes in learning and initiate opportunities for new learning in their home languages or Standard Australian English
  • acknowledge and accept affirmation
  • assert their capabilities and independence while demonstrating increasing awareness of the needs and rights of others
  • recognise the contributions they make to shared projects and experiences

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • show genuine affection, understanding and respect for all children
  • collaborate with children to document their achievements and share their successes with their families
  • ensure that all children experience pride in their attempts and achievements
  • promote children’s sense of belonging, connectedness and wellbeing
  • challenge and support children to engage in and persevere at tasks and play
  • build upon and extend children’s ideas
  • maintain high expectations of each child’s capabilities
  • value children’s personal decision-making
  • welcome children and families sharing aspects of their culture and spiritual lives
  • talk with children about their emotions and responses to events with a view to supporting their understandings of emotional regulation and self-control
  • acknowledge and affirm children’s effort and growth
  • mediate and assist children to negotiate their rights in relation to the rights of others

Children take increasing responsibility for their own health and physical wellbeing

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • recognise and communicate their bodily needs (for example, thirst, hunger, rest, comfort, physical activity)
  • are happy, healthy, safe and connected to others
  • engage in increasingly complex sensory-motor skills and movement patterns
  • combine gross and fine motor movement and balance to achieve increasingly complex patterns of activity including dance, creative movement and drama
  • use their sensory capabilities and dispositions with increasing integration, skill and purpose to explore and respond to their world
  • demonstrate spatial awareness and orient themselves, moving around and through their environments confidently and safely
  • manipulate equipment and manage tools with increasing competence and skill
  • respond through movement to traditional and contemporary music, dance and storytelling
  • show an increasing awareness of healthy lifestyles and good nutrition
  • show increasing independence and competence in personal hygiene, care and safety for themselves and others
  • show enthusiasm for participating in physical play and negotiate play spaces to ensure the safety and wellbeing of themselves and others

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • plan for and participate in energetic physical activity with children, including dance, drama, movement and games
  • draw on family and community experiences and expertise to include familiar games and physical activities in play
  • provide a wide range of tools and materials to resource children’s fine and gross motor skills
  • actively support children to learn hygiene practices
  • promote continuity of children’s personal health and hygiene by sharing ownership of routines and schedules with children, families and the community
  • discuss health and safety issues with children and involve them in developing guidelines to keep the environment safe for all
  • engage children in experiences, conversations and routines that promote healthy lifestyles and good nutrition
  • consider the pace of the day within the context of the community
  • model and reinforce health, nutrition and personal hygiene practices with children
  • provide a range of active and restful experiences throughout the day and support children to make appropriate decisions regarding participation 

 

OUTCOME 4: CHILDREN ARE CONFIDENT AND INVOLVED LEARNERS

  • Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

  • Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating

  • Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another

  • Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

(Ref:  BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia) 

 

Children develop dispositions for learning such as curiosity, cooperation, confidence, creativity, commitment, enthusiasm, persistence, imagination and reflexivity

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • express wonder and interest in their environments
  • are curious and enthusiastic participants in their learning
  • use play to investigate, imagine and explore ideas
  • follow and extend their own interests with enthusiasm, energy and concentration
  • initiate and contribute to play experiences emerging from their own ideas
  • participate in a variety of rich and meaningful inquiry-based experiences
  • persevere and experience the satisfaction of achievement
  • persist even when they find a task difficult

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • recognise and value children’s involvement in learning
  • provide learning environments that are flexible and open-ended
  • respond to children’s displays of learning dispositions by commenting on them and providing encouragement and additional ideas
  • encourage children to engage in both individual and collaborative explorative learning processes
  • listen carefully to children’s ideas and discuss with them how these ideas might be developed
  • provide opportunities for children to revisit their ideas and extend their thinking
  • model inquiry processes, including wonder, curiosity and imagination, try new ideas and take on challenges
  • reflect with children on what and how they have learned
  • build on the knowledge, languages and understandings that children bring to their early childhood setting
  • explore the diversity of cultures and social identities
  • promote in children a strong sense of who they are and their connectedness to others – a shared identity as Australians

Children develop a range of skills and processes such as problem solving, enquiry, experimentation, hypothesising, researching and investigating

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • apply a wide variety of thinking strategies to engage with situations and solve problems, and adapt these strategies to new situations
  • create and use representation to organise, record and communicate mathematical ideas and concepts
  • make predictions and generalisations about their daily activities, aspects of the natural world and environments, using patterns they generate or identify and communicate these using mathematical language and symbols
  • explore their environment
  • manipulate objects and experiment with cause and effect, trial and error, and motion
  • contribute constructively to mathematical discussions and arguments
  • use reflective thinking to consider why things happen and what can be learnt from these experiences

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • plan learning environments with appropriate levels of challenge where children are encouraged to explore, experiment and take appropriate risks in their learning
  • recognise mathematical understandings that children bring to learning and build on these in ways that are relevant to each child
  • provide babies and toddlers with resources that offer challenge, intrigue and surprise, support their investigations and share their enjoyment
  • provide experiences that encourage children to investigate and solve problems
  • encourage children to use language to describe and explain their ideas
  • provide opportunities for involvement in experiences that support the investigation of ideas, complex concepts and thinking, reasoning and hypothesising
  • encourage children to make their ideas and theories visible to others
  • model mathematical and scientific language and language associated with the arts
  • join in children’s play and model reasoning, predicting and reflecting processes and language
  • intentionally scaffold children’s understandings
  • listen carefully to children’s attempts to hypothesise and expand on their thinking through conversation and questioning

Children transfer and adapt what they have learned from one context to another

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • engage with and co-construct learning
  • develop an ability to mirror, repeat and practice the actions of others, either immediately or later
  • make connections between experiences, concepts and processes
  • use the processes of play, reflection and investigation to solve problems
  • apply generalisations from one situation to another
  • try out strategies that were effective to solve problems in one situation in a new context
  • transfer knowledge from one setting to another

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • value signs of children applying their learning in new ways and talk about this with them in ways that grow their understanding
  • support children to construct multiple solutions to problems and use different ways of thinking
  • draw children’s attention to patterns and relationships in the environment and in their learning
  • plan for time and space where children can reflect on their learning and to see similarities and connections between existing and new learning
  • share and transfer knowledge about children’s learning from one setting to another, by exchanging information with families and with professionals in other settings
  • encourage children to discuss their ideas and understandings
  • understand that competence is not tied to any particular language, dialect or culture

Children resource their own learning through connecting with people, place, technologies and natural and processed materials

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • engage in learning relationships
  • use their senses to explore natural and built environments
  • experience the benefits and pleasures of shared learning exploration
  • explore the purpose and function of a range of tools, media, sounds and graphics
  • manipulate resources to investigate, take apart, assemble, invent and construct
  • experiment with different technologies
  • use information and communication technologies (ICT) to investigate and problem solve
  • explore ideas and theories using imagination, creativity and play
  • use feedback from themselves and others to revise and build on an idea

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • provide opportunities and support for children to engage in meaningful learning relationships
  • provide sensory and exploratory experiences with natural and processed materials
  • provide experiences that involve children in the broader community and environment beyond the early childhood setting
  • think carefully about how children are grouped for play, considering possibilities for peer scaffolding
  • introduce appropriate tools, technologies and media and provide the skills, knowledge and techniques to enhance children’s learning
  • provide opportunities for children to both construct and take apart materials as a strategy for learning
  • develop their own confidence with technologies available to children in the setting
  • provide resources that encourage children to represent their thinking 

 

OUTCOME 5: CHILDREN ARE EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATORS

  • Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

  • Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts

  • Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media

  • Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work

  • Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking

(Ref:  BELONGING, BEING & BECOMING The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia) 

 

Children interact verbally and non-verbally with others for a range of purposes

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • engage in enjoyable interactions using verbal and non-verbal language
  • convey and construct messages with purpose and confidence, building on home/family and community literacies
  • respond verbally and non-verbally to what they see, hear, touch, feel and taste
  • use language and representations from play, music and art to share and project meaning
  • contribute their ideas and experiences in play, small and large group discussions
  • attend and give cultural cues that they are listening to and understanding what is said to them
  • are independent communicators who initiate Standard Australian English and home language conversations and demonstrate the ability to meet the listeners’ needs
  • interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, clarify and challenge thinking, negotiate and share new understandings
  • convey and construct messages with purpose and confidence, building on literacies of home/family and the broader community
  • exchange ideas, feelings and understandings using language and representations in play
  • demonstrate an increasing understanding of measurement and number using vocabulary to describe size, length, volume, capacity and names of numbers
  • express ideas and feelings and understand and respect the perspectives of others
  • use language to communicate thinking about quantities to describe attributes of objects and collections, and to explain mathematical ideas
  • show increasing knowledge, understanding and skill in conveying meaning in at least one language

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • engage in enjoyable interactions with babies as they make and play with sounds
  • are attuned and respond sensitively and appropriately to children’s efforts to communicate
  • listen to and respond to children’s approximations of words
  • value children’s linguistic heritage and with family and community members encourage the use of and acquisition of home languages and Standard Australian English
  • recognise that children enter early childhood programs having begun to communicate and make sense of their experiences at home and in their communities
  • model language and encourage children to express themselves through language in a range of contexts and for a range of purposes
  • engage in sustained communication with children about ideas and experiences, and extend their vocabulary
  • include real-life resources to promote children’s use of mathematical language

Children engage with a range of texts and gain meaning from these texts

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • listen and respond to sounds and patterns in speech, stories and rhymes in context
  • view and listen to printed, visual and multimedia texts and respond with relevant gestures, actions, comments and/or questions
  • sing and chant rhymes, jingles and songs
  • take on roles of literacy and numeracy users in their play
  • begin to understand key literacy and numeracy concepts and processes, such as the sounds of language, letter-sound relationships, concepts of print and the ways that texts are structured
  • explore texts from a range of different perspectives and begin to analyse the meanings
  • actively use, engage with and share the enjoyment of language and texts in a range of ways
  • recognise and engage with written and oral culturally constructed texts

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • read and share a range of books and other texts with children
  • provide a literacy-enriched environment including display print in home languages and Standard Australian English
  • sing and chant rhymes, jingles and songs
  • engage children in play with words and sounds
  • talk explicitly about concepts such as rhyme and letters and sounds when sharing texts with children
  • incorporate familiar family and community texts and tell stories
  • join in children’s play and engage children in conversations about the meanings of images and print
  • engage children in discussions about books and other texts that promote consideration of diverse perspectives
  • support children to analyse ways in which texts are constructed to present particular views and to sell products
  • teach art as language and how artists can use the elements and principles to construct visual/musical/dance/media texts
  • provide opportunities for children to engage with familiar and unfamiliar culturally constructed text

Children express ideas and make meaning using a range of media

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • use language and engage in play to imagine and create roles, scripts and ideas
  • share the stories and symbols of their own culture and re-enact well-known stories
  • use the creative arts such as drawing, painting, sculpture, drama, dance, movement, music and storytelling to express ideas and make meaning
  • experiment with ways of expressing ideas and meaning using a range of media
  • begin to use images and approximations of letters and words to convey meaning

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • build on children’s family and community experiences with creative and expressive arts
  • provide a range of resources that enable children to express meaning using visual arts, dance, drama and music
  • ask and answer questions during the reading or discussion of books and other texts
  • provide resources that encourage children to experiment with images and print
  • teach children skills and techniques that will enhance their capacity for self-expression and communication
  • join in children’s play and co-construct materials such as signs that extend the play and enhance literacy learning
  • respond to children’s images and symbols, talking about the elements, principles, skills and techniques they have used in order to convey meaning

Children begin to understand how symbols and pattern systems work

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • use symbols in play to represent and make meaning
  • begin to make connections between and see patterns in their feelings, ideas, words and actions and those of others
  • notice and predict the patterns of regular routines and the passing of time
  • develop an understanding that symbols are a powerful means of communication and that ideas, thoughts and concepts can be represented through them
  • begin to be aware of the relationships between oral, written and visual representations
  • begin to recognise patterns and relationships and the connections between them
  • begin to sort, categorise, order and compare collections and events and attributes of objects and materials, in their social and natural worlds
  • listen and respond to sounds and patterns in speech, stories and rhyme
  • draw on memory of a sequence to complete a task
  • draw on their experiences in constructing meaning using symbols

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • draw children’s attention to symbols and patterns in their environment and talk about patterns and relationships, including the relationship between letters and sounds
  • provide children with access to a wide range of everyday materials that they can use to create patterns and to sort, categorise, order and compare
  • engage children in discussions about symbol systems, for example, letters, numbers, time, money and musical notation
  • encourage children to develop their own symbol systems and provide them with opportunities to explore culturally constructed symbol systems

Children use information and communication technologies to access information, investigate ideas and represent their thinking

This is evident, for example, when children:

  • identify the uses of technologies in everyday life and use real or imaginary technologies as props in their play
  • use information and communication technologies to access images and information, explore diverse perspectives and make sense of their world
  • use information and communication technologies as tools for designing, drawing, editing, reflecting and composing
  • engage with technology for fun and to make meaning

Educators promote this learning, for example, when they:

  • provide children with access to a range of technologies
  • integrate technologies into children’s play experiences and projects
  • teach skills and techniques and encourage children to use technologies to explore new information and represent their ideas
  • encourage collaborative learning about and through technologies between children, and children and educators